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Single Review: Zac Brown Band - No Hurry

By: Bobby Peacock

Last Updated: March 20, 2012 11:03 AM

Zac Brown Band is certainly one of the most delightful anomalies in country music. In an era where more and more musicians are bringing in the hard rock influences they've grown up on, the mellowness of the ZBB really stands out. An affinity for tuneful, inspired music and interesting (often nylon string guitar-driven) arrangements certainly doesn't hurt either.

"No Hurry" lives up to its name. The song is indeed unhurried, laid back without feeling lethargic. It starts off in a similar vein to countless other songs about casting off one's problems in a relaxed fashion (cane pole, folding chair, riverbank), but you know what? I believe him. If anyone can convince me that he's really going fishing to take the weight of the world off his mind, it's Zac Brown. "No Hurry" also gets major points for adding a little more depth to the situation: "Have 'em take their time when they lay this sinner down / Heaven knows that I ain't perfect / I've raised a little cain…" Again, a fully believable, down-to-earth realization. I really liked it when Kenny Chesney said the same thing in "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" ("…but nobody wants to go now"), but I'm enjoying Zac Brown's spin even more. Finally, the instrumentation is as impeccable as it is on any other ZBB song: nylon-string guitar, fiddle, Hammond organ, steel guitar, all taking their turns.

Maybe it's the fact that we're finally getting some real spring weather up here, or maybe it's just that this is such a calming song. Either way, Zac Brown and his band (and of course, co-writers Wyatt Durette and James "Why can't I get a hit" Otto) add yet again to an amazing catalog of hits. Even better, they also have a shot at tying the record of 5 consecutive #1 hits from an album with this one — and given their track record, I'm just gonna go ahead and call it a #1. Thank you, country radio, for always finding room for the ZBB.

 

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